PATENT SCOPE AND ENABLEMENT IN RAPIDLY DEVELOPING ARTS

ALAN L. DURHAM

READ MORE | 94 N.C. L. Rev. 1099 (2016)

PRECEDENT IN STATUTORY INTERPRETATION

LAWRENCE M. SOLAN

READ MORE | 94 N.C. L. Rev. 1165 (2016)

ADAPTIVE DISCRIMINATION

ELISE C. BODDIE

READ MORE | 94 N.C. L. Rev. 1235 (2016)

Plausibly Willful—Tightening Pleading Standards in FACTA Credit Card Receipt Litigation Where Only an Expiration Date Is Present

J. Patrick Redmon

READ MORE | 94 N.C. L. Rev. 1314 (2016)

The Uninvited Guest: The Unexpected Damage to Privacy from the Expansion of Implied Licenses

Isaac A. Rank

READ MORE | 94 N.C. L. Rev. 1354 (2016)

An “Insurmountable Hurdle” to Class Action Certification? The Heightened Ascertainability Requirement’s Effect on Small Consumer Claims

Sarah R. Cansler

READ MORE | 94 N.C. L. Rev. 1382 (2016)
Addendum

MERS on the March: Why the Mortgage Electronic Registration System Threatens the Property Rights of Bankrupt Mortgagees

Jenelle Peterson

94 N.C. L. Rev. Addendum 18 (2015)

The Root Canal of Antitrust Immunity: North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners v. FTC

Kate Ortbahn

94 N.C. L. Rev. Addendum 1 (2015)

Online Bullying and the First Amendment: State Cyberbullying Statutes After People v. Marquan M.

Haley E. Phillips Click here for PDF* Introduction When fourteen-year-old Sarah[1] first signed up for ask.fm, an anonymous, question-based social media site, the questions and answers were simple and fun.[2] But soon she started getting more sinister messages.[3] Anonymous posters began to tease Sarah about the boy she had a crush on at school.[4] Her mother was sure Sarah’s classmates were sending the messages, but there was no way to prove their identity.[5]… READ MORE

93 N.C. L. Rev. Addendum 179 (2015)

Earning a “C” for Rulemaking: The Ambiguity and Potential Impact of a Recent SEC Rule Governing Nationally Registered Statistical Rating Organizations

Kyle R. Cunnion Click here for PDF* Introduction Imagine the world’s richest person, Bill Gates, and his more than $80 billion net worth.[1] Now imagine 136 equally wealthy individuals, whose combined $11 trillion net worth[2] would exceed the 2013 gross domestic product (“GDP”) of every country in the world except for the United States.[3] Finally, imagine that all of these individuals and their associated wealth very quickly disappeared, such that every person even… READ MORE

93 N.C. L. Rev. Addendum 150 (2015)
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